Speciality Courses
 
Enriched Air Diver (Nitrox)

The PADI Enriched Air Diver course is PADI’s most popular specialty scuba diving course, and it’s easy to see why. Scuba diving with enriched air nitrox gives you more no decompression dive time. This means more time underwater, especially on repetitive scuba dives.

 

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Search and Recovery

Find lost items and lift them to the surface. It’s fun to use the lift bag. Not only are these skills fun, but very practical and ultimately useful because eventually, you’ll lose something in the water. As a Search and Recovery Diver, you’ll know how to search for and recover it.

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Wreck Diver

Most divers find wrecked ships, airplanes and even automobiles nearly irresistible because they’re intriguing to explore, exciting avenues of discovery, and usually teeming with aquatic life. The PADI Wreck Diver course teaches you the ins and outs of rewarding, responsible wreck diving.

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Peak Performance Buoyancy

Divers who’ve mastered the highest performance levels in buoyancy stand apart. You’ve seen them underwater. They glide effortlessly, use less air and ascend, descend or hover, almost as if by thought. The PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy course refines the basic skills you learned as a PADI Open Water Diver and elevates them to the next level.

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Night Diver

As the sun sets, you don your dive gear, slip on your scuba mask and bite down on your dive regulator. A deep breath and you step off the boat – into the underwater night. Although you’ve seen this reef many times before, this time you drop into a whole new world and watch it come to life under the glow of your dive light.

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Deep Diver

After your first few scuba dives, you soon want to explore a bit deeper. There’s something exciting and mysterious about the depth that attracts dives.

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Equipment Specialist

As a PADI Equipment Specialist, you are prepared for the basic scuba equipment maintenance, care and adjustments you'll encounter every day. In addition, you'll learn interesting background information about how your gear works, how it’s repair and other information that helps you with your equipment investment.

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Dry Suit Diver

Dry suits let you dive more challenging dive sites, and extend your dive season. When you have the right cold water scuba diving attire, you can stand up to the elements and take advantage of the generally better visibility offered by winter months—especially at inland dive sites such as quarries, lakes, sinkholes and caves

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Multilevel Diver

In this course, you learn how to plan dives that extend your bottom time by crediting you for slower nitrogen absorption when you ascend to a shallower depth. That’s the way you really dive, after all. This is a great way to learn how to make multilevel dives even if you forget to bring your dive computer.

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Emergency Oxygen Provider

Be the one ready to help a fellow diver should the need arise by becoming a PADI Emergency Oxygen Provider. Breathe easy—knowing that you know how to recognize illnesses treatable by emergency oxygen. Being the best buddy you can be means being prepared – especially in a time of need.

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Altitude Diver

Any time you’re diving at 300 to 3000 metres/1000 to 10,000 feet above sea level, you're altitude diving. If you want to explore the hidden world of a mountain lake, the PADI Altitude Diver Specialty course is for you.

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Underwater Navigator

Finding your way is not a matter of luck! When everyone’s buzzing about a reef or checking out a shipwreck, they’re having a great time – until it’s time to go. Then they turn to you, because as a PADI Underwater Navigator, you know the way back to the boat.

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Boat Diver

Whether you’ve never made a boat dive or you’ve logged dozens, the PADI Boat Diver Specialty course can benefit almost every diver because different boats in different parts of the world do things differently. Diving from a boat is fun, especially when you look at ease when maneuvering around on it. It’s fun to know what you’re doing.

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Digital Underwater Photography

Underwater photography is one of the most popular diving specialties, and the rise of digital underwater photography has made it easier and more fun than ever. This is why there are actually two PADI underwater photography courses. 

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Drift Diver

The PADI Drift Diver Specialty course introduces you to the coolest magic carpet ride you’ll ever experience. This course shows you how to enjoy rivers and ocean currents by “going with the flow,” staying with your dive partner, communicating with the dive boat and knowing where you are the whole time. Drift Diving is nearly effortless and relaxing. 

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Project AWARE Specialist

You can make a difference. Learn about some of the most pressing problems facing these vulnerable environments and everyday actions you can take to help conserve them. It’s informative, interesting and most importantly, you learn how to make a difference.

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AWARE Coral Reef Conservation

The AWARE Coral Reef Conservation Specialty course is designed to inform you about the world’s coral reefs. As a scuba diver, the health of aquatic ecosystems is often what makes a good dive. Become aware of the fragileness of coral reefs and how you can help preserve them.

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Underwater Naturalist

Look closer to see more on your next dive. Look for symbioses, predator/prey and other relationships between aquatic plant and animal life. Learn not just what fish and animals are, but how they interact with each other and the environment.

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